Grey Design Blog

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How To Keep Your Succulents Alive

Posted by Julia Fields on

The tips and tricks to keeping your indoor succulents alive!

Read more

How To Keep Your Succulents Alive

Posted by Julia Fields on

The tips and tricks to keeping your indoor succulents alive!

Read more


5 Easy Ways To Cut Down Plastic Use

Posted by Julia Fields on

It seems most everywhere we look there is an overwhelming amount of plastic. From the packaging of the food we eat, holding the water we need to sustain ourselves, or virtually any other container imaginable; I felt like plastic was everywhere and I couldn’t escape. I decided I wanted to make a change, but felt like no matter what difference I could try to make it would never be enough. I figured cutting out plastic completely would be pretty much impossible, but why not do some easy swaps where I could? These were my top 5 easiest ways I was able to reduce my plastic use pretty much overnight. 

Bring Your Own Bags

Bringing a reusable bag proved to be one of the easiest switches I have made so far! Simply turning down a plastic bag for single item purchases, and requesting no bag for leftovers when you go out to eat will have you saving plastic left and right. By having about 8-10 reusable bags, you should be able to make even the largest grocery hall and with bags to spare. A great way to store all these bags is by keeping them in a large hot/cold bag in the trunk of the car. Additionally, by keeping them in the car, opposed to trying to just remember to bring them places straight from home, you won't be forced to use plastic when you take an unexpected trip to the mall or grocery store.

Water Filter & Reusable Bottle

I’ll be the first to admit, I loved the convenience of a plastic water bottle. They fit in your fridge, you can buy them virtually anywhere, and if you accidentally leave one somewhere it is no big deal. I thought one a day really couldn’t be that bad, until I learned that out of the 50 billion [plastic] bottles used every year that 80% of them end up in the landfill.  I felt a sense of guilt for having contributed to this number, no matter how small my contribution may have been. That, along with the health negatives associated with plastic bottles was enough to get me on the reusable water bottle chain. Not only did an insulated water bottle and water filter pay for themselves in no time, I also found myself drinking more water since I could consistently have the water temperature I like.

Reusable Cups

This may seem like a given, seeing as though a reusable water bottle had quickly become a niche in my everyday life, but it took a little getting used to for beverages besides water. The hardest part was remembering to bring a cup with me. It took some thought and planning every day, but after a couple of weeks I got so good at remembering, I was able to start matching my mugs and/or tumblers to my outfit; a tad over the top I know, but I sort of love it. Bonus Tip: I keep a small basket in the back seat of my car with emergency supplies, adding a reusable cup took up virtually no extra space and has come in handy countless times. 

Reusable straws

While many cities offer convenient recycling bins, there are one thing these bins don’t cover, and that’s plastic straws. The more I paid attention, the more I noticed that straws are pretty much everywhere. I started carrying a few reusable straws in my purse or backpack. Now, when I go out to eat I just request no straw, businesses don’t seem to mind – after all, it is saving them product and in turn cutting down expense.  When I forget my straw, I found I get used to going without one in about 5 minutes or less. I didn’t think it would make that big of a difference until I realized I had only used about 3 disposable straws in the past 3 months, down from an average of about 1.6 per day.

Switching to Bar Soaps

I jumped all in and brought in bar shampoo and bar conditioner into my hair washing routine. By alternating between bars and the products I already had under the sink, I could see a noticeable change in my plastic usage. This one may not be for everyone, but one switch everyone can do is making the switch to bar soap for hand washing. There is actually a number of benefits to using bar soap as opposed to liquid soap from a plastic pump, too. Bar soaps are also a great way to support local and/or small businesses; at Grey Design we work with an all-natural vendor here in Phoenix to bring our customers safe and quality products using traditional soap making techniques. I like to use our California Coast as my main hand soap, and Naked as my body wash. Dahlia is my favorite soap to use for my face and my go-to gift idea. Bonus Tip: I like microwave my soaps for about 10 seconds then cut them in half or even thirds to make them last a little longer before I use them in the shower. 

 

Trying to go completely plastic free can be difficult and overwhelming. But by making small, conscious choices every day we can all make a difference in reducing our waste. I'll admit, some are a tad over the top, and it takes some getting use to, but the impact you're making is more than worth it.

Read more

5 Easy Ways To Cut Down Plastic Use

Posted by Julia Fields on

It seems most everywhere we look there is an overwhelming amount of plastic. From the packaging of the food we eat, holding the water we need to sustain ourselves, or virtually any other container imaginable; I felt like plastic was everywhere and I couldn’t escape. I decided I wanted to make a change, but felt like no matter what difference I could try to make it would never be enough. I figured cutting out plastic completely would be pretty much impossible, but why not do some easy swaps where I could? These were my top 5 easiest ways I was able to reduce my plastic use pretty much overnight. 

Bring Your Own Bags

Bringing a reusable bag proved to be one of the easiest switches I have made so far! Simply turning down a plastic bag for single item purchases, and requesting no bag for leftovers when you go out to eat will have you saving plastic left and right. By having about 8-10 reusable bags, you should be able to make even the largest grocery hall and with bags to spare. A great way to store all these bags is by keeping them in a large hot/cold bag in the trunk of the car. Additionally, by keeping them in the car, opposed to trying to just remember to bring them places straight from home, you won't be forced to use plastic when you take an unexpected trip to the mall or grocery store.

Water Filter & Reusable Bottle

I’ll be the first to admit, I loved the convenience of a plastic water bottle. They fit in your fridge, you can buy them virtually anywhere, and if you accidentally leave one somewhere it is no big deal. I thought one a day really couldn’t be that bad, until I learned that out of the 50 billion [plastic] bottles used every year that 80% of them end up in the landfill.  I felt a sense of guilt for having contributed to this number, no matter how small my contribution may have been. That, along with the health negatives associated with plastic bottles was enough to get me on the reusable water bottle chain. Not only did an insulated water bottle and water filter pay for themselves in no time, I also found myself drinking more water since I could consistently have the water temperature I like.

Reusable Cups

This may seem like a given, seeing as though a reusable water bottle had quickly become a niche in my everyday life, but it took a little getting used to for beverages besides water. The hardest part was remembering to bring a cup with me. It took some thought and planning every day, but after a couple of weeks I got so good at remembering, I was able to start matching my mugs and/or tumblers to my outfit; a tad over the top I know, but I sort of love it. Bonus Tip: I keep a small basket in the back seat of my car with emergency supplies, adding a reusable cup took up virtually no extra space and has come in handy countless times. 

Reusable straws

While many cities offer convenient recycling bins, there are one thing these bins don’t cover, and that’s plastic straws. The more I paid attention, the more I noticed that straws are pretty much everywhere. I started carrying a few reusable straws in my purse or backpack. Now, when I go out to eat I just request no straw, businesses don’t seem to mind – after all, it is saving them product and in turn cutting down expense.  When I forget my straw, I found I get used to going without one in about 5 minutes or less. I didn’t think it would make that big of a difference until I realized I had only used about 3 disposable straws in the past 3 months, down from an average of about 1.6 per day.

Switching to Bar Soaps

I jumped all in and brought in bar shampoo and bar conditioner into my hair washing routine. By alternating between bars and the products I already had under the sink, I could see a noticeable change in my plastic usage. This one may not be for everyone, but one switch everyone can do is making the switch to bar soap for hand washing. There is actually a number of benefits to using bar soap as opposed to liquid soap from a plastic pump, too. Bar soaps are also a great way to support local and/or small businesses; at Grey Design we work with an all-natural vendor here in Phoenix to bring our customers safe and quality products using traditional soap making techniques. I like to use our California Coast as my main hand soap, and Naked as my body wash. Dahlia is my favorite soap to use for my face and my go-to gift idea. Bonus Tip: I like microwave my soaps for about 10 seconds then cut them in half or even thirds to make them last a little longer before I use them in the shower. 

 

Trying to go completely plastic free can be difficult and overwhelming. But by making small, conscious choices every day we can all make a difference in reducing our waste. I'll admit, some are a tad over the top, and it takes some getting use to, but the impact you're making is more than worth it.

Read more


Is Formaldehyde in your Fabrics?

Posted by Ashley Marshall on

How often do you stop to think about how the furnishings in your living space affect air quality? Although you may take special care to shop for environmentally safe furnishings, even specifically search for those with "green-friendly" labeling, it's difficult to avoid the chemicals used to make textiles more attractive, durable and cheap. Formaldehyde is a common fabric preservative used pervasively in the textile industry, even among manufacturers that target an environmentally aware consumer base. The Center for Disease Control has found that formaldehyde can irritate nasal passages and make your eyes water and burn. If you have allergies, a commitment to sustainability or children, it's best to minimize the amount of formaldehyde in your home.

 

What is formaldehyde?

An organic compound found throughout nature, formaldehyde can be found just about everywhere. The human body itself is even one of its producers, and small amounts of the compound aren't harmful. But because so many manufacturers rely on formaldehyde, a dangerous dose could culminate through the new furniture, carpet and fabrics inside your house and contaminate the air. When inhaled in substantial quantities, formaldehyde is a known carcinogen.

Don't panic!

It is uncommon for people to get cancer from average exposure, but it could aggravate allergies or cause other symptoms like fatigue. If you've ever gone shopping for new clothes and found yourself sniffing, coughing or left with a headache, you might be formaldehyde-sensitive. Furniture, fabrics and other products -- even bed pillows -- are usually preserved with formaldehyde. Curtains and drapes are especially concerning because of their size, proximity to air vents, and because they aren't usually washed before installation. If you've already invested in textiles treated with formaldehyde, rest assured that the chemical will eventually disperse to negligible amounts. If the fabrics are new, consider an air purifier nearby.

Identifying formaldehyde

Because manufacturers aren't required to mention formaldehyde on packaging, controlling its prevalence in your home isn't easy. As a general rule, avoid synthetics like polyester, acrylic and blends like acetate -- it's impossible to for manufacturers to produce those fabrics without using chemicals. Look instead for home furnishings by independent manufacturers who are dedicated to ecological sustainability and healthful surroundings. Search also for curtains and coverings labeled "garment dyed," meaning the fabric was untreated before taking in the dye and therefore is less contaminated with chemicals and preservatives. (Be aware, however, that garment-dyed fabrics usually aren't colorfast.) Natural fibers like linen, silk, and wool are worth the investment that pays off in beauty and durability as well as safety. Also consider manufacturing techniques: Pima and Egyptian cotton, for example, are both spun with a long hand that produces a silky finish without the need for chemical treatment.

Finding the best fabrics

Safe, affordable and formaldehyde-free fabrics can be found in retail stores, boutiques, outdoor markets, even in thrift stores. Online companies like Rawganique, among many others, produce and sell organic curtains and coverings as beautiful as any you'd find in popular home decor stores, and you won't have to pay much more; you may even save a little. You can also find organic coverings at big-name stores like Pottery Barn; in most cases, however, the selection is limited and often very plain. The interesting prints and plaids you might prefer are more often found at independent companies or in artisan communities, such as Etsy.

Browse our online store at Grey Design for throws, towels, pillows, blankets and more sustainable decor. As you acquire natural textiles, make sure to read the labels before washing to prevent shrinkage and color fading. As you gradually fill your spaces with quality cotton, linen and silk, the absence of synthetic materials will make a difference in how you breathe, sleep, eat and live.

Read more

Is Formaldehyde in your Fabrics?

Posted by Ashley Marshall on

How often do you stop to think about how the furnishings in your living space affect air quality? Although you may take special care to shop for environmentally safe furnishings, even specifically search for those with "green-friendly" labeling, it's difficult to avoid the chemicals used to make textiles more attractive, durable and cheap. Formaldehyde is a common fabric preservative used pervasively in the textile industry, even among manufacturers that target an environmentally aware consumer base. The Center for Disease Control has found that formaldehyde can irritate nasal passages and make your eyes water and burn. If you have allergies, a commitment to sustainability or children, it's best to minimize the amount of formaldehyde in your home.

 

What is formaldehyde?

An organic compound found throughout nature, formaldehyde can be found just about everywhere. The human body itself is even one of its producers, and small amounts of the compound aren't harmful. But because so many manufacturers rely on formaldehyde, a dangerous dose could culminate through the new furniture, carpet and fabrics inside your house and contaminate the air. When inhaled in substantial quantities, formaldehyde is a known carcinogen.

Don't panic!

It is uncommon for people to get cancer from average exposure, but it could aggravate allergies or cause other symptoms like fatigue. If you've ever gone shopping for new clothes and found yourself sniffing, coughing or left with a headache, you might be formaldehyde-sensitive. Furniture, fabrics and other products -- even bed pillows -- are usually preserved with formaldehyde. Curtains and drapes are especially concerning because of their size, proximity to air vents, and because they aren't usually washed before installation. If you've already invested in textiles treated with formaldehyde, rest assured that the chemical will eventually disperse to negligible amounts. If the fabrics are new, consider an air purifier nearby.

Identifying formaldehyde

Because manufacturers aren't required to mention formaldehyde on packaging, controlling its prevalence in your home isn't easy. As a general rule, avoid synthetics like polyester, acrylic and blends like acetate -- it's impossible to for manufacturers to produce those fabrics without using chemicals. Look instead for home furnishings by independent manufacturers who are dedicated to ecological sustainability and healthful surroundings. Search also for curtains and coverings labeled "garment dyed," meaning the fabric was untreated before taking in the dye and therefore is less contaminated with chemicals and preservatives. (Be aware, however, that garment-dyed fabrics usually aren't colorfast.) Natural fibers like linen, silk, and wool are worth the investment that pays off in beauty and durability as well as safety. Also consider manufacturing techniques: Pima and Egyptian cotton, for example, are both spun with a long hand that produces a silky finish without the need for chemical treatment.

Finding the best fabrics

Safe, affordable and formaldehyde-free fabrics can be found in retail stores, boutiques, outdoor markets, even in thrift stores. Online companies like Rawganique, among many others, produce and sell organic curtains and coverings as beautiful as any you'd find in popular home decor stores, and you won't have to pay much more; you may even save a little. You can also find organic coverings at big-name stores like Pottery Barn; in most cases, however, the selection is limited and often very plain. The interesting prints and plaids you might prefer are more often found at independent companies or in artisan communities, such as Etsy.

Browse our online store at Grey Design for throws, towels, pillows, blankets and more sustainable decor. As you acquire natural textiles, make sure to read the labels before washing to prevent shrinkage and color fading. As you gradually fill your spaces with quality cotton, linen and silk, the absence of synthetic materials will make a difference in how you breathe, sleep, eat and live.

Read more


5 Tips to Make Your Home Office Space Design Work Better for You

Posted by Ashley Marshall on

To get as much done as possible when you work from home, you want to make sure that you have the right office space. Research shows that office organization and design plays a big part in health, well-being, and overall productivity. If you're struggling to find the right setup, the following tips can help you create a healthy home office space so that you maximize productivity and reach your work goals.

Get Rid of Clutter

Clutter is common — but it has to go! Minimalism is key to your workspace. Take a look at your desk and decide what items are most important. If it isn't a necessary item, pack it away. A desk that is too cluttered can be distracting and can cause stress.
Experiment with office organization solutions like filing systems and fun containers. Don't be afraid to support handmade while designing your home office area. Handmade items will inspire you and make your office space feel unique.
You may need to play around with your new system until you feel more comfortable with it. Once you know where everything belongs, it'll be easy to keep your office area clutter-free. It'll make your space look great, too!

Add Plants to Your Workspace

Adding plants to your home workspace is another design improvement that can boost productivity. Studies show that plants can increase concentration and can increase productivity by 15%. Adding plants can also dress up the look of your office. If you have pets, be sure to consider possible plant toxicity when looking for the best office plants to buy. Bamboo, spider plants, and cushion moss are great plants that are perfectly fine to have around your fur pals!

 

Improve Lighting

If you have a dull office space, it can be hard to see your work clearly, and you may feel uninspired. Poor lighting can cause headaches and can lead to less productivity and increased fatigue. So, open up your blinds and curtains to let more natural light—this is called daylighting. Research studies show that exposure to daylighting during the workday can allow for better sleep and overall quality of life. This can lead to better success at work, too. Bringing in more natural light can also make your office area look more welcoming.

Invest in a Quality Office Chair

The design of your desk chair is important, but comfort is crucial. If you have a chair that you're constantly adjusting, it can be hard to focus on your work. Having a more comfortable chair can help you get work done faster, have more energy and make fewer errors.
Try shopping for a new chair in person so that you can play around with the height and other adjustments. This can also give you a better idea as to whether you can work comfortably for several hours at a time. There are chair options in a mix of price ranges, but we highly suggest the Herman Miller chair—it offers great comfort and it's stylish, too.

Use Calming Colors in Your Office Design

Playing with color is another great way to improve your office look and design. Wall color can also influence mood. Blue coloring, for example, can offer a more calming effect than other colors. If you're open to adding a fresh coat of paint, consider how the new color will integrate with the decor of your room, but also think about how the color change may affect your mood. A wellness interior designer can help you choose the right color.
By making improvements to your home office and considering wellness design in your home, you can also improve your mood and productivity. There are many great social impact products for the home that can help you achieve your design goals. 

Read more

5 Tips to Make Your Home Office Space Design Work Better for You

Posted by Ashley Marshall on

To get as much done as possible when you work from home, you want to make sure that you have the right office space. Research shows that office organization and design plays a big part in health, well-being, and overall productivity. If you're struggling to find the right setup, the following tips can help you create a healthy home office space so that you maximize productivity and reach your work goals.

Get Rid of Clutter

Clutter is common — but it has to go! Minimalism is key to your workspace. Take a look at your desk and decide what items are most important. If it isn't a necessary item, pack it away. A desk that is too cluttered can be distracting and can cause stress.
Experiment with office organization solutions like filing systems and fun containers. Don't be afraid to support handmade while designing your home office area. Handmade items will inspire you and make your office space feel unique.
You may need to play around with your new system until you feel more comfortable with it. Once you know where everything belongs, it'll be easy to keep your office area clutter-free. It'll make your space look great, too!

Add Plants to Your Workspace

Adding plants to your home workspace is another design improvement that can boost productivity. Studies show that plants can increase concentration and can increase productivity by 15%. Adding plants can also dress up the look of your office. If you have pets, be sure to consider possible plant toxicity when looking for the best office plants to buy. Bamboo, spider plants, and cushion moss are great plants that are perfectly fine to have around your fur pals!

 

Improve Lighting

If you have a dull office space, it can be hard to see your work clearly, and you may feel uninspired. Poor lighting can cause headaches and can lead to less productivity and increased fatigue. So, open up your blinds and curtains to let more natural light—this is called daylighting. Research studies show that exposure to daylighting during the workday can allow for better sleep and overall quality of life. This can lead to better success at work, too. Bringing in more natural light can also make your office area look more welcoming.

Invest in a Quality Office Chair

The design of your desk chair is important, but comfort is crucial. If you have a chair that you're constantly adjusting, it can be hard to focus on your work. Having a more comfortable chair can help you get work done faster, have more energy and make fewer errors.
Try shopping for a new chair in person so that you can play around with the height and other adjustments. This can also give you a better idea as to whether you can work comfortably for several hours at a time. There are chair options in a mix of price ranges, but we highly suggest the Herman Miller chair—it offers great comfort and it's stylish, too.

Use Calming Colors in Your Office Design

Playing with color is another great way to improve your office look and design. Wall color can also influence mood. Blue coloring, for example, can offer a more calming effect than other colors. If you're open to adding a fresh coat of paint, consider how the new color will integrate with the decor of your room, but also think about how the color change may affect your mood. A wellness interior designer can help you choose the right color.
By making improvements to your home office and considering wellness design in your home, you can also improve your mood and productivity. There are many great social impact products for the home that can help you achieve your design goals. 

Read more


Is Bamboo the Best Green Choice for Your Home?

Posted by Ashley Marshall on

Bamboo is one of the most eco-friendly resources on the planet, and for good reason. It grows incredibly fast, reaching a mature, usable level in just two to four years. This is bounds faster than traditional forestation, which takes 50 to 60 years to reach a usable level. Some varieties of bamboo can grow up to four feet in just one day!  

Bamboo has been called a miracle plant due to its unique properties. It's stronger by weight than steel, it's naturally antibacterial (so it doesn't need pesticides to help it grow) and it self-propagates, meaning it regrows on its own. These features make it a desirable natural resource.

What Is Bamboo Used For?

This incredibly strong and versatile grass is used throughout the world for various purposes, including building materials, household items, clothing and even food. Bamboo flooring is common in many parts of the world today due to its strength and beauty.

Bamboo cutting boards are a popular choice for chefs and home cooks alike. Their dense composition makes them resistant to knife cuts, keeping them cleaner and less likely to incubate bacteria. They also require less maintenance than traditional woods like cherry and maple.

Supply and Demand

With the increasing demand around the world for eco-friendly and sustainable products, the market for bamboo has never been more lucrative. This is a $60 billion industry and growing. This demand comes at a price, however. Farmers across the globe are eager to cash in on this cash crop, leading to some less than eco-friendly farming methods.

In places like China, where industry regulations are limited or nonexistent, farmers have turned to pesticides and fertilizers to increase their yields and therefore their profits. They are also replacing farmland with bamboo forests, leading to reduced biodiversity and more soil erosion.

Processing Is a Problem, Too

While bamboo is naturally eco-friendly, the processing steps it goes through to become a usable product aren't always best for the environment. Harsh chemicals are sometimes used to break down the tough plant into fibers that can be used for clothing and linens. While there are sustainable ways to do this with natural enzymes, not everything produced is using this method because it is more expensive and takes more time.

So What Can You Do?

If you're like most people, you're concerned about the social impact of products for the home. The good news is that not all bamboo products are bad for the environment. The key is finding the right ones.

There are several organizations that will certify the growing conditions of bamboo. The Forest Stewardship Council (FSC) and the Rainforest Alliance are two of them. Looking for these certifications can help you choose products that are grown to be highly sustainable without a negative impact on the environment. Different industries representing different finished products have their own certifications as well.

Flooring

The flooring industry is a perfect example of this. A FloorScore certification for indoor air quality is a great addition to an FSC recommendation. LEEDS and BREEAM are also important marks to look for.

Household Products

Bamboo is a common material for drapes, linens and other fabrics around the home. In order to ensure you're getting items that align with your worldview, look for ones with the STANDARD 100 by OEKO-TEX® certification. This ensures that products are free from colorants and other chemicals you don't want in your home.

The Bottom Line

While in theory bamboo is an eco-friendly and sustainable natural resource, in reality, a lot of things can be happening behind the scenes that are not so good for planet Earth. Watching what you buy and looking for products that are certified by reputable organizations will help you be sure you are getting items that are good for your family and good for the environment as well.

Read more

Is Bamboo the Best Green Choice for Your Home?

Posted by Ashley Marshall on

Bamboo is one of the most eco-friendly resources on the planet, and for good reason. It grows incredibly fast, reaching a mature, usable level in just two to four years. This is bounds faster than traditional forestation, which takes 50 to 60 years to reach a usable level. Some varieties of bamboo can grow up to four feet in just one day!  

Bamboo has been called a miracle plant due to its unique properties. It's stronger by weight than steel, it's naturally antibacterial (so it doesn't need pesticides to help it grow) and it self-propagates, meaning it regrows on its own. These features make it a desirable natural resource.

What Is Bamboo Used For?

This incredibly strong and versatile grass is used throughout the world for various purposes, including building materials, household items, clothing and even food. Bamboo flooring is common in many parts of the world today due to its strength and beauty.

Bamboo cutting boards are a popular choice for chefs and home cooks alike. Their dense composition makes them resistant to knife cuts, keeping them cleaner and less likely to incubate bacteria. They also require less maintenance than traditional woods like cherry and maple.

Supply and Demand

With the increasing demand around the world for eco-friendly and sustainable products, the market for bamboo has never been more lucrative. This is a $60 billion industry and growing. This demand comes at a price, however. Farmers across the globe are eager to cash in on this cash crop, leading to some less than eco-friendly farming methods.

In places like China, where industry regulations are limited or nonexistent, farmers have turned to pesticides and fertilizers to increase their yields and therefore their profits. They are also replacing farmland with bamboo forests, leading to reduced biodiversity and more soil erosion.

Processing Is a Problem, Too

While bamboo is naturally eco-friendly, the processing steps it goes through to become a usable product aren't always best for the environment. Harsh chemicals are sometimes used to break down the tough plant into fibers that can be used for clothing and linens. While there are sustainable ways to do this with natural enzymes, not everything produced is using this method because it is more expensive and takes more time.

So What Can You Do?

If you're like most people, you're concerned about the social impact of products for the home. The good news is that not all bamboo products are bad for the environment. The key is finding the right ones.

There are several organizations that will certify the growing conditions of bamboo. The Forest Stewardship Council (FSC) and the Rainforest Alliance are two of them. Looking for these certifications can help you choose products that are grown to be highly sustainable without a negative impact on the environment. Different industries representing different finished products have their own certifications as well.

Flooring

The flooring industry is a perfect example of this. A FloorScore certification for indoor air quality is a great addition to an FSC recommendation. LEEDS and BREEAM are also important marks to look for.

Household Products

Bamboo is a common material for drapes, linens and other fabrics around the home. In order to ensure you're getting items that align with your worldview, look for ones with the STANDARD 100 by OEKO-TEX® certification. This ensures that products are free from colorants and other chemicals you don't want in your home.

The Bottom Line

While in theory bamboo is an eco-friendly and sustainable natural resource, in reality, a lot of things can be happening behind the scenes that are not so good for planet Earth. Watching what you buy and looking for products that are certified by reputable organizations will help you be sure you are getting items that are good for your family and good for the environment as well.

Read more